The 12 Most Influential British Royal Wedding Dresses of All Time

When Meghan Markle ties the knot with Prince Harry this May with their highly anticipated royal wedding at St. George's Chapel, she'll also be revealing something that's been a point of intrigue since the couple announced their engagement last year: her royal wedding dress.With Markle's wedding dress, the former actress will join a long history of British Royal Family brides whose style and sartorial selections for their British royal wedding dresses through the years have affected the fashion trends of brides everywhere. Take for instance, Queen Victoria's white lace and silk gown, which popularized the tradition of brides wearing white or consider the lasting influence that Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge's v-neck and lace Alexander McQueen dress by Sarah Burton still has on the wedding market today.Before Megan Markle walks down the aisle to say "I do," here's a look back on the iconic British Royal Family brides who came before her and the royal wedding dresses they wore for their big days.Queen Victoria (m. 1840)Queen Victoria is largely credited with starting the popular tradition of brides wearing white to their weddings after she selected a gown made of silk, satin, and lace to wear while saying her vows to Prince Albert. According to Vogue, Victoria picked the white shade not to symbolize her purity, as the tradition usually insinuates now, but because she wanted to highlight the lace on her dress to greater effect. The stylish queen also had some bridal demands: no one else could wear white at her wedding and she had the pattern for her wedding dress destroyed after the dress was made so that it couldn't be replicated.The Queen Mother, then Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (m. 1923)When Queen Elizabeth - then Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon - married Prince Albert, the Duke of York (later King George VI), in 1923, she wore a wedding ensemble that definitely reflected the times. Her pearl and silver thread embroidered silk crepe moire (a fabric with a ripply effect) gown was designed by Madame Handley Seymour and had a dropped waist. The flapper-esque British royal wedding dress was perfectly complemented by a delicate Juliet lace cap.Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor (1937)Wallis Simpson's third marriage, to Edward, Duke of Windsor, scandalized the country because he abdicated the throne of King of England to wed a twice-divorced American socialite. For her wedding, Wallis wore a silk crepe dress designed by a fellow American expat, Mainbocher, who was working in Paris. The streamlined dress was dyed "Wallis blue," a pale blue shade that the designer said matched Wallis' famous light blue eyes. In lieu of a veil, Wallis wore a Caroline Reboux hat.Queen Elizabeth II (m. 1947)When Queen Elizabeth married Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh in 1947, WWII had only ended two years prior - which meant that the young royal had to purchase the tulle, chiffon and silk for her wedding gown using ration coupons that she had saved (Queen Elizabeth was generously granted 200 extra ration coupons as well, for the royal wedding). The war's political aftermath also affected the fabric of the dress; the silk used for Elizabeth's gown was from China, as opposed to WWII foes Japan or Italy. The British royal wedding dress, which was designed by Norman Hartnell and inspired by a Botticelli painting, had 10,000 seed pearls sewn into the floral design of the dress and took 350 women seven weeks to make.Elizabeth paired her gown with a veil and the Queen Mary's Fringe Tiara, which she borrowed from her mother, Queen Elizabeth I, but the silver, diamond and gold tiara broke the morning of the wedding and was hastily repaired by a jeweler before the ceremony. If you look closely, you can see a slight gap towards the center of the tiara.Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon (m. 1960)Princess Margaret married fashion photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones in a full-skirted silk organza wedding dress designed by Norman Hartnell, who designed Queen Elizabeth's silk and lace wedding gown just 13 years earlier. While Margaret's British royal wedding dress had very little embellishment, her dramatic silhouette style (which reportedly required close to 100 feet of fabric) was complemented by a cathedral length veil held in place by the Poltimore tiara.Katharine, Duchess of Kent (m. 1961)When Katharine, the Duchess of Kent, married Prince Edward, she wore a gown designed by John Cavanagh, who helped create her mother-in-law Princess Marina's own wedding day look. Her white silk gauze dress featured a high neckline and long sleeves and a commanding train that definitely contributed to why the gown took 273 yards of fabric.Princess Alexandra, the Honourable Lady Ogilvy (m. 1963)Princess Alexandra, Queen Elizabeth's first cousin, wore a John Cavanagh dress to marry Scottish businessman Sir Angus Ogilvy. Her decision to work with John Cavanagh was a family affair; the designer not only helped make her mother, Princess Marina's wedding gown while working for another design house, but he also made her sister-in-law Katharine, Duchess of Kent's wedding dress.Anne, Princess Royal (m. 1973)Princess Anne wore a high-necked embroidered gown by Maureen Baker for the label Susan Small to wed Captain Mark Phillips. The dress was designed in the Tudor style and featured long medieval sleeves that were edged in pearls; pearls and silver thread also embellished the back of the princess' gown. She paired the gown with a voluminous veil and held it in place with Queen Mary's fringe tiara, the same tiara that her mother, Queen Elizabeth, wore to her wedding.Diana, Princess of Wales (m. 1981)Princess Diana's wedding dress remains one of the most iconic wedding looks in history, thanks to its elegant and feminine style. The dress was designed by then husband and wife team David and Elizabeth Emanuel and was made out of ivory silk taffeta with a piece of antique lace that had belonged to Queen Mary embellishing the gown; Diana also paid homage to the old adage for brides, having something old (Queen Mary's lace), something new (the dress itself), something borrowed (her tiara, which belonged to her family since the 18th century), and something blue (a small bow sewn into the waist of her dress).The dress featured puffed sleeves, ruffles on the bodice and arm openings and a 25-foot train that was only surpassed by her 153 yard veil, which she wore with the Spencer tiara. The dress was a closely guarded secret until the ceremony - so much so that a decoy gown was made to be worn instead in case the actual gown was leaked to the press.Sarah, Duchess of York (m. 1986)When Sarah Ferguson married Prince Andrew, she wore an elegant ivory duchesse satin gown that was designed by Lindka Cierach. The dress had a 17-foot long train and intricate embroidery and beading that referenced her union with the Prince: their initials intertwined, motifs from her family crest, and anchors and waves that paid tribute to Prince Andrew's sailing background.Sophie, Countess of Wessex (m. 1999)Sophie Rhys-Jones tied the knot to Queen Elizabeth's youngest son, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, in 1999, at St. George's Chapel, the same location where Meghan Markle and Prince Harry will say their vows this spring. For her big day, Sophie selected a long-sleeved gown by British fashion designer Samantha Shaw that was embellished with 325,000 crystals and pearls. Sophie wore a tiara from the Queen's private collection and a black and white pearl necklace and earrings set designed by her husband as a wedding gift. Both the jewelry and the tiara were made by Asprey and Garrard.Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (m. 2005)For her second wedding to Prince Charles in 2005, Camilla Parker Bowles wore a cream dress with a embroidered silk overdress by London designers Antonia Robinson and Anna Valentine, under the label Robinson Valentine (now known as Anna Valentine). Camilla's dress' sleek and clean silhouettes was more low-key than other royal brides, most likely because it was a second marriage for both herself and the Prince. She paired her wedding ceremony ensemble with a lace and feather hat by storied British hat designer Philip Treacy.Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (m. 2011)Kate Middleton's wedding gown was one of the most highly-anticipated reveals of her 2011 wedding to Prince William. Neither the design of the dress or the designer were announced until the bride was on her way to the wedding ceremony. The iconic and oft-copied wedding dress was designed by Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen and featured a relatively deep-v neckline, a 9-foot train, and lace overlay, as well as Victorian-inspired corsetry and padding on the hips to create the illusion of a more narrow waist. Like Diana, Middleton also followed the bridal tradition of having something old, new, borrowed, and blue, with an old lace technique being used for the lace on her gown, new earrings (a gift from her parents), a blue ribbon sewn into the inside of the dress, and the Queen's Cartier halo tiara, borrowed to hold her veil in place.

The 12 Most Influential British Royal Wedding Dresses of All Time 1

get in touch with us
مقالات مقترحة
مدونة او مذكرة
Elegant Wedding Dresses for Real Beach Weddngs
Many couples prefer a wedding at the beach, choose a beautiful wedding dress is very important.Martina Liana BrideFrom the Martina Liana bride: Deron and I knew shortly after we met that this was the real deal. Early on we started talking about what we would do for a wedding, and for us it was just easy to say lets get away and let this be about us. We knew we wanted to go somewhere tropical, and Mexico is fairly easy to travel to. I started to search for resorts, and The Royal seemed to stand out, as many friends have actually been there as well. We were also in the middle of building our new home, so we wanted our wedding to be stress free, relaxing, and somewhere warm. We stayed down there for our honeymoon, and it was truly the best week of my life!allure brideWe have to sigh with just a little bit of envy at this incredible wedding. Every intimate, cheery detail of Dulce Marks Hawaiian nuptials, captured by Naomi Wong Photography, is nothing short of incredible. And weve yet to see a bride more stunning than Dulce with pearlescent orchids in her bridal bouquet and soft half updo. She wore one of our very favorite classic lace gowns, perfect on her petite frame. The couple kept their look organic, warm and totally beautiful. And how could you expect anything less in such a perfect location?Eddy K. BrideTo find her dress, Shannon visited some stores out of town before realizing Petrov Bridal was right there in her hometown. She liked how the store stood up with all the European designers. Thanks to the help of the owner, after trying on many dresses, Shannon was mesmerized by the ADK 77961.She had some alterations done to the dress since she wanted an even lower illusion back and she added a beautiful belt to compliment her waistline. She also wore Swarovski Crystal Diapason earrings that matched the shape of the lace. Her mom had a pendant specially made containing a small capsule with her dads ashes so she could have her dad with her on her wedding day. She also had a small picture of him attached to the bouquet.Maggie BrideMaggie bride Jessica shimmered with elegance and sweet sophistication in her Jade gown from Maggie Sotteros Serencia Collection. Inspired by the wedding partys Caribbean backdrop, Jessica and her groom, Steve, chose pearls and coral-pink dresses for the bridesmaids, and smart suspenders and navy-blue suits for the groomsmen. Steve had proposed to Jessica by leaving a message-in-a-bottle in the sand near his parents beach house he had to point it out twice before Jessica pulled out the cork to find Will you marry me? scrolled on the paper inside! Jessicas favorite part of her wedding was when she and Steve danced to Tim McGraws My Best Friend, and Steve sang to her. I couldnt stop smiling, says Jessica after all the chaos and emotion of nuptials, its important to remind yourself of what is truly important.Its clear that our lace wedding dress was meant to find its way to Jessica; it was the first dress she tried on! Jade features an exquisite double-keyhole back and a Swarovski crystal- and bead-encrusted bodice. These lavish embellishments add tasteful opulence to the gowns delicate cap sleeves and chapel-length train. We love that Jessica styled her locks in side-swept waves to match her nautical theme; it gave the occasion an air of Old Hollywood glamour and fit perfectly with the gowns luxe shimmer and sweetheart neckline! We think she looks just like a mermaid princess.FeelDress.com is the global online retailer with an affordable item for every hobby and lifestyle.the main products include formal wedding dress,informal wedding dress,flower girl dress and accessory,available worldwide at unbeatable prices,make FeelDress.com a part of your life!·RELATED QUESTIONWhat is the reasoning for making a buddhist statue out of gold?Practically, religious images are made using precious medals to prevent decay, so that the image can be available to venerate for many generations to come. From a more devotional aspect, choosing materials that we think of as beautiful shows a great reverence for the person that image represents. Religious images often "open and lift our minds" to higher ideals, including dharma practice, which is why, for example, people can be better practiticioners just by being in the temple's main hall, where the main images usually are.I suppose a good analogy is showing respect for your boss and co-workers by coming to work in what best represents the workplace's business casual dress code, not just in a T-shirt with holes. Or, having enough respect for yourself to attend to your basic hygiene before leaving your home. Precious metals and stones are frequently used in religious imagery. For example, in the Larger Pureland Sutra (Verse 54), we have: Furthermore, throughout that land are trees made of the seven gems. There are trees of gold; trees of silver; trees of coral; trees of amber; trees of agate; trees of ruby; and trees of lapis lazuli. Then there are trees of two precious substances, trees of three, four, up to all seven. Some gold trees have silver leaves, flowers and fruits. Some silver trees have gold leaves, flowers and fruits. Some coral trees have leaves flowers and fruit of amber. Some amber trees have leaves flowers and fruit of coral. Some agate trees have leaves, flowers and fruit of ruby. Some ruby trees have leaves, flowers and fruits of agate. Some lapis lazuli trees have leaves, flowers and fruit of all sorts of jewels.There are trees with red gold roots, white silver trunks, coral branches, amber twigs, agate leaves, ruby flowers and lapis lazuli fruits. There are trees with white silver roots, coral trunks, amber branches, agate twigs, ruby leaves, lapis lazuli flowers and red gold fruit. There are trees with coral roots, amber trunks, agate branches, ruby twigs, lapis lazuli leaves, red gold flowers and white silver fruit. There are trees with amber roots, agate trunks, ruby branches, lapis lazuli twigs, gold leaves, silver flowers and coral fruits. There are trees with agate roots, ruby trunks, lapis lazuli branches, gold twigs, silver leaves, coral flowers and amber fruit. There are trees with ruby roots, lapis lazuli trunks, gold branches, silver twigs, coral leaves, amber flowers and agate fruit. There are trees with lapis lazuli roots, gold trunks, silver branches, coral twigs, amber leaves, agate flowers and ruby fruits.The general understanding is that even the most beautiful objects we have on earth still pale in comparison to the beauty of the dharma, and this is just our feeble attempt to reflect that, and, like Jyothi said, offer our best to the Supreme One, who gives us a much more valuable gift.Edit - user70 clarified:What is the justification for such a statue? By justification I mean, what reasons would the Buddhists who created/use the statue give to explain why keeping gold (often seen as a sign of wealth and power) as a statue is right; as opposed to using the money from melting it down and selling it to buy meals for the homeless or others in need.Well, a lot of institutions do both. At my Thai Forest (Theravdin) sangha, there are golden images, and we also give to charity, and obviously we do not charge for any services. The retreats, and even the Thai language classes, are completely donation-based. We do not shame anyone who cannot donate anything, and people with means donate more than enough to make-up for it. So we make sure that nothing keeps people from learning, not even lack of funds.Not everyone will probably agree with this, but I propose that artistic beauty is an intrinsic good. This is why we continue to promote the arts in the secular world--I can't eat a beautiful painting, but it can nourish my mind, even if only in the moment I am looking at it. In my experience with working and feeding homeless people in a religious setting, many liked that we were providing them with food and warm shelter in the cold, as well as a beautiful setting to just appreciate our art. I don't know if many of us who have an almost unlimited access to beautiful images through internet searches can fathom living a life where all you saw was ugly, dark decay. It does not make for a healthy mind, which goes hand-in-hand with a healthy body. So to answer your question, in the real world, it does not have to be an either/or decision (between beauty/charity), nor is it a zero-sum game where charity is sacrificed for art. When there are greedy people heaping up image after image for greed's sake, perverting the purpose of Buddhist imagery--which is to communicate the dharma--there should be accountability. The presence of art wouldn't hinder the advocacy of accountability
Back to School Help!Read Details! Get 10Points For1 with Best Outfit!?
Design Scheme of Multi-channel Voltage Measurement Based on Stm32
How Does Temperature Affect the Speed of Sound?
What Is WiFi? Just Tell Me What It Is, and What It's Used For.?
Which Is Better, WiFi Or ZigBee Wireless Technology
Smart Home Promotes Building Intercom into Thousands of Households, with Large Stock and Incremental
Upgrading of Set Top Box
Buying Manchester United Tickets Online with a One United Membership?
The Benefits of Using the Right Fence Post Lights
related searches
Elegant Wedding Dresses for Real Beach Weddngs
Back to School Help!Read Details! Get 10Points For1 with Best Outfit!?
Design Scheme of Multi-channel Voltage Measurement Based on Stm32
How Does Temperature Affect the Speed of Sound?
What Is WiFi? Just Tell Me What It Is, and What It's Used For.?
Which Is Better, WiFi Or ZigBee Wireless Technology
Smart Home Promotes Building Intercom into Thousands of Households, with Large Stock and Incremental
Upgrading of Set Top Box
Buying Manchester United Tickets Online with a One United Membership?

KingBird Home Furniture