Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change

Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change

Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change 1

The Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change was a special appointment made at the University of Adelaide and funded by the Government of South Australia. It was established with funding for four years, beginning in 2006-07. The Chair's role is to advise government, industry, and the community on how to tackle climate change. The Chair is also tasked to draw together expertise in climate change from across the university. The foundation appointee to the position was Professor Barry Brook who held the position for 8 years until December 2014. From 1 January 2015 to 15 January 2017, the position was held by Professor Corey J. A. Bradshaw. It is unknown if the position will continue

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Simpson's Ivory Chair Reconstruction

FormAlthough the Pratt ivories cannot be fully understood due to the loss of their archaeological context, Elizabeth Simpson, through in depth analysis of the sphinxes and lion legs determined that the pieces were originally part of what had been a low throne or chair. Her reconstruction of the work, based on close investigation of the ivories' construction, reveals a chair with legs formed from the sphinxes and lion legs. The sphinxes are the lowest element, touching the floor and supporting the weight of the chair. The lion legs rest on top these, facing forward. The front two sphinxes also face forward, while those forming the back legs face outwards to the sides. The rest of the chair, including the frame, seat, backs, and stretchers, would have been made from fine wood. It is likely that the falcon and gazelle panels, among others, decorated the back of the chair, in accordance with examples seen in Egypt from the 18th Dynasty. Other Pratt panels with rosettes and guilloche motifs may have originally been incorporated into the design of the chair, but unfortunately it is impossible to determine their exact arrangement. Sumptuous textile cushions on the seat would have completed the luxurious effect. ColorExamination of the ivory pieces also revealed traces of gilding and inlay, indicating that the chair was further embellished with gold, silver, and precious or semi-precious stones. Based on this trace evidence, the sphinxes appear to have had dark, inlaid eyes and were decorated with applied gold and (perhaps) silver leaf. The platforms beneath the lion paws also appear to have been gilded. Traces of silver on the falcon suggest that it too was once covered. It is possible that even more extensive areas than those suggested by the remaining traces were once gilded, but that the fire reached temperatures high enough to burn off much the metal. The color of the sphinxes and lion legs are also frequently commented upon in scholarship of the ivories. Variations in color occur among the pieces (gray, pink, orange, and red), resulting in pieces that match in form but not in color. These disparities are the result of varying conditions (i.e. the level of oxygen) in the fire that destroyed the palace. The ivories were covered with an iron-oxide rich clay slip, which reacted to these particular conditions, resulting in the color changes. Why the ivories were covered in this slip is another question. It is possible that the clay was applied to act as a bole, to assist in the application and burnishing of gold leaf. Simpson notes, however, that the slip occurs on the undersides and backs of the pieces, which would not have been gilded. Red ivory is also a decorative form attested to in texts of the period, which scholars have interpreted as meaning that ivory was often stained a reddish color. Perhaps in this case, the slip performed two functions, as a bole for applied gilding, and as a colorant for the exposed areas of ivory.

Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change 2

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Isokon Long Chair

The Isokon Long Chair is a chair designed by Marcel Breuer for the Isokon company in 1935-36. The chair is considered one of the most important pieces of furniture to emerge from the inter-war modern movement and it is in the permanent collections of several internationally renowned museums including the Victoria and Albert Museum. Breuer came to Britain in the mid-1930s following the closure of the Bauhaus by the Nazis. He became acquainted with Jack Pritchard, the owner of Isokon, who suggested he design furniture for the company. Pritchard had become interested in the plywood designs of Alvar Aalto and wanted to produce similar furniture himself. The Long Chair was an adaptation of a previous design for an aluminium framed chaise Breuer had produced in 1932.

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